dove tales

anthology

bridges or walls?

Image courtesy of Angela Catlin

Cover design by Mark Mechan

Bridges or Walls? This is not just a question, it is a choice,  a choice we all face. We live in an era of unprecedented instability, with 70.8 million people on the move in the world today, more than at any time since the Second World War. 

According to Medecins du Monde, that's 37000 people forced to flee their homes every day.

Where are they supposed to go? And what are we supposed to do? Build a wall against them, ploughing through nature reserves and people's land as Donald Trump is doing? Leave it to the poorest countries in the world to take them in? Dump their children into cramped, unhygienic camps? 

Leave them lying dead on beaches, far away from their homes? 

Or do we build bridges, come together to find solutions that are fair to everyone - and mean everyone has a home? A UN refugee camp does not constitute a home.

All over the world people are out on the streets protesting about inequality, oppression, war, climate change. In Dove Tales we choose to raise our voices in protest too. We don't claim to have the answers, but through poems and stories and art and music we do ask the questions. 

Till Christmas only the book is available for £7, including post and packaging.

To order your copy please click here: 

A Kind of Stupidity, published by Vagabond Voices, is an anthology of poetry and prose on the subject of war. It features members of Dove Tales, but also many writers who have shared their work simply because they care about the same issues that we do.

 

Some of the poems and stories are brand new, some are already loved.

 

Our writers include - in no particular order - Robin Lloyd-Jones, AC Clarke, Allan Cameron, Ellen McAteer, Ray Evans, Kathryn Metcalfe, Liz Niven, Chrys Salt, Finola Scott, Peter Kelly... need I go on? It's a tremendous collection of work and we're really proud of it.

The book, as you'll see from the cover above, is beautiful. It's also challenging, moving and exciting.

This is what the novelist James Robertson says about it:

We think we are powerless in the face of war, violence and destruction, but we are not. If enough of us speak out for peace, justice and understanding, as the poems and stories in this anthology do, then we can change the world for the better

      James Robertson, 2018.